Updated September 09, 2018 09:53:57 A new study has found that the compound called nalidixic acid can reduce the symptoms of a variety of chronic diseases.

The compound, used to treat some infections including malaria and hemorrhagic fever, has previously been shown to help reduce inflammation in people with HIV and AIDS.

The results of the new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) appeared to show that nalidoximid might also be useful for people suffering from a variety, potentially life-threatening conditions, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, Crohn’s disease and inflammatory bowel disease.

The team used mice to test the effects of nalidaxone on the immune system.

They found that nirvanoxate, a drug used in the treatment of acute respiratory syndrome and Crohn´s disease, helped mice with COVID-19 reduce the inflammation in the airways, which would prevent the infection from progressing.

This was accompanied by the formation of antibodies against the virus, which helped the mice fight off the infection.

In addition, the researchers found that mice with inflammation in their lungs showed less inflammation when given nirvonoxate.

This finding suggests that niroxic acid may also help with some chronic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disorder.

Dr Raul Garcia, the lead author of the study, from the University of Adelaide, said the results of his study were surprising.

Dr Garcia said that he hoped that the research could lead to more research on niruanoxate as it is used in some medical conditions. “

It does not work with COV-19, but it is still very promising.”

Dr Garcia said that he hoped that the research could lead to more research on niruanoxate as it is used in some medical conditions.

He added that he was keen to learn more about how the drug worked and how it could be used to help patients suffering from chronic diseases such as Crohnís disease and asthma.

Dr Garcia added: “We hope to have a better understanding of nirvaroxate and see if it could help reduce COVID infections, and maybe even people who suffer from chronic illnesses like asthma and COVID.”

He said the research team were looking forward to working with more scientists to determine how the compound was able to reduce the severity of the COVID infection and inflammation in mice, and whether it might be helpful in people suffering with similar chronic diseases or conditions.

Dr María Cerna from the Queensland Department of Health, who was not involved in the research, said that the findings were exciting, but that there were some limitations to the study.

She said that while the team had used mice, there was no evidence that nilvoxate had any effect on COVID or CVD.

Dr Cernan said that she had been a bit sceptical about the study’s results, but she was impressed by the results.

She said the researchers were now looking at whether nirvana could be administered orally, using a topical solution. “

I think that there is some possibility that this is an alternative to other drugs that we’ve tried and tested before.”

She said the researchers were now looking at whether nirvana could be administered orally, using a topical solution.

She added that the team was looking at the possibility of using the drug to treat patients with a variety chronic conditions, but also some other chronic diseases that have a higher risk of relapse.

Dr Maria Cernabrera, who is also a researcher with the Queensland department of health, said: ‘We are looking forward and working with the researchers in our own research area to see if they can find any other compounds that may help treat these diseases.’

The study was funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia.

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